Technology/Project Lead the Way » Technology/Project Lead the Way

Technology/Project Lead the Way

A student may receive a 5-unit Technology sequence, which can take the place of the three-unit Foreign Language requirement for an Advanced Regents Diploma with Career & Financial Management and all four high school Project Lead The Way courses.

 

A student may receive a 5-unit Interdisciplinary sequence, which can take the place of the three-unit Foreign Language requirement for an Advanced Regents Diploma with:

  1. Career & Financial Management
  2. Business Elective
  3. Business Elective
  4. Design & Drawing for Production (PLTW)*
  5. Computer Integrated Manufacturing (PLTW)

*Design & Drawing for Production may be used towards the completion of one-unit art or music graduation requirement.

 

Technology 8:  Students are introduced to the nature of technology and the ways technological systems such as construction, manufacturing, transportation, and communication satisfy human needs and wants.  Coursework involves research, problem solving, planning, building, testing, and evaluating various processes, devices, and outputs of technology.  In addition, students are exposed to technological concepts such as control of processes, career opportunities, personal and social implications of technology and the use of the computer as a tool.  This is the gateway course to the Project Lead the Way curriculum which students will have the option of continuing in high school. Students will experience field trips and public speakers to explore various careers and professions.

 

Design & Drawing for Production: This is a 1.0 credit full year course that uses a problem solving model to improve existing products and invent new ones. Students dig deep into the engineering design process, applying math, science, and engineering standards to hands-on projects, such as puzzle cubes or automaton displays. They work both individually and in teams to design solutions to a variety of problems using 3D computer aided design software, 3D printers, traditional hand tools, and engineering notebooks. DDP assumes the student is concurrently enrolled in Algebra I or higher. There is the potential to receive college credit at a reduced rate through R.I.T. 

GCC - EGR 100 Introduction to Engineering (3 college credits) 

 

Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM):  This is a 1.0 credit full year course that applies principles of robotics and automation to Computer Aided Design (CAD).  The course builds on computer solid modeling skills developed in Design & Drawing for Production. Students use Computer Numerical Control (CNC) equipment to produce actual models of their three-dimensional designs. Students will learn different types of programming languages and have full access to a CNC Mill, 3D printers, and a laser engraver. This course illuminates the opportunities related to understanding manufacturing. At the same time, it teaches students about manufacturing processes, product design, robotics, and automation. Students will build and program projects, such as traffic light controller, security lock, and elevator controller. Students will also design and build an LED engraved light while learning about the manufacturing progresses. Computer Integrated Manufacturing assumes the completion of Algebra I and DDP or waiver. Also, concurrent enrollment in Geometry is recommended. There is the potential to receive college credit at a reduced rate through R.I.T. 

GCC - EGR 108 Manufacturing Processes (3 college credits)

 

Digital Electronics:  This is a 1.0 credit full year course that allows students to analyze, design, and build their own digital electronic circuits, the technology that powers your cell phone, tablet, television, and game consoles. Digital circuits are all around us and this course provides a foundation for students who are interested in learning more about electronics and their role in today's digital world. Students study topics such as combinational and sequential logic and are exposed to circuit design tools used in industry, including logic gates, integrated circuits, and programmable logic devices. Students will design and build a variety of projects. Students do not need to have any prior knowledge of electronics or PLTW courses before taking this course. Digital Electronics assumes the completion of Algebra I and Geometry with at least a C. There is the potential to receive college credit at a reduced rate through R.I.T.

 

PLTW/AP Computer Science Principles:  AP Computer Science Principles offers a multidisciplinary approach to teaching the underlying principles of computation. The course will introduce students to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, the Internet, cybersecurity concerns, and computing impacts. AP Computer Science Principles also gives students the opportunity to use current technologies to create computational artifacts for both self-expression and problem solving. Together, these aspects of the course make up a rigorous and rich curriculum that aims to broaden participation in computer science. Students will finish the course by taking the PLTW exam as well as the AP Computer Science exam. (Full year, 1.0 credit)