Technology/Project Lead the Way » Technology/Project Lead the Way

Technology/Project Lead the Way

A student may receive a 5-unit Technology sequence, which can take the place of the three-unit Foreign Language requirement for an Advanced Regents Diploma with Career & Financial Management and all four high school Project Lead The Way courses.

 

A student may receive a 5-unit Interdisciplinary sequence, which can take the place of the three-unit Foreign Language requirement for an Advanced Regents Diploma with:

  1. Career & Financial Management
  2. Business Elective
  3. Business Elective
  4. Design & Drawing for Production (PLTW)*
  5. Computer Integrated Manufacturing (PLTW)

*Design & Drawing for Production may be used towards the completion of one-unit art or music graduation requirement.

 

Technology 8:  Students are introduced to the nature of technology and the ways technological systems such as construction, manufacturing, transportation, and communication satisfy human needs and wants.  Coursework involves research, problem solving, planning, building, testing, and evaluating various processes, devices, and outputs of technology.  In addition, students are exposed to technological concepts such as control of processes, career opportunities, personal and social implications of technology and the use of the computer as a tool.  This is the gateway course to the Project Lead the Way curriculum which students will have the option of continuing in high school. Students will experience field trips and public speakers to explore various careers and professions.

 

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY

 

The district has incorporated the Project Lead the Way engineering curriculum into the Technology Education Program. This program starts at the middle school level and continues to more in-depth studies at the high school level. The courses are specifically designed to prepare students for further education and careers in engineering and other technical fields.

 

Project Lead the Way students have exclusive access to a variety of recognition opportunities including scholarships, preferred admission at colleges or universities, internships, industry connections, and other avenues to highlight their achievements. For more details go to https://www.pltw.org/experience-pltw/student-opportunities

 

In addition, the Le Roy High School technology teacher is certified to teach the following courses for college credit from RIT and GCC. Students may pay a minimum tuition fee to the college and they receive credit from both Le Roy and the college. For RIT credit, the process is very similar to the Advanced Placement (AP) courses administered in the core areas which includes an end of course final exam.

 

Class RIT GCC
Design Drawing for Production (DDP) 3 credits  
Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) 3 credits 3 credits
Digital Electronics (DE) 3 credits  
Principles of Engineering (POE) 3 credits  

 

Design & Drawing for Production: This is a 1.0 credit full year course in the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) engineering program, and also in the same category as an Advanced Placement (AP) class. It is a rigorous university-level course with a final exam which allows high school students to earn college credit while still in high school. DDP is a blend of technical drawing and computer aided design (CAD) all rolled into one course. Students will learn how to solve real world problems presented in class by using their mathematical knowledge, communication skills, and the computer and technical drawing skills they will develop during the course of a year. Students will use the engineering design process, quickly design their ideas on paper, and then mock up their own designs using Autodesk Inventor 3D software. Students will be given opportunities to build prototypes and test working models of their problem-solving techniques. Students practice working in groups and as individuals on problem solving projects. They may give presentations to the class on their findings and designs. Activities may include designing, building, and testing a Puzzle Cube or an Automata using 3D computer aided design software, 3D printers, and a laser engraver. DDP assumes the student is concurrently enrolled in Algebra I or higher and has completed Math 8 with at least a C. There is the potential to receive college credit at a reduced rate through R.I.T. Performance on the PLTW End of Course Assessment may result in students receiving dual credit, scholarships, or admissions preferences at various higher education institutions.

 

Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM):  This is a 1.0 credit full year course in the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) engineering program, and also in the same category as an Advanced Placement (AP) class. It is a rigorous university-level course with a final exam which allows high school students to earn college credit while still in high school. The CIM course applies principles of robotics and automation to Computer Aided Design (CAD). The course builds on computer solid modeling skills developed in Design & Drawing for Production. Students use Computer Numerical Control (CNC) equipment to produce actual models of their three-dimensional designs. Students will learn different types of programming languages and have full access to a CNC Mill, 3D printers, and a laser engraver. This course teaches students about manufacturing processes and product design. In addition, students will learn to program a robotic arm to perform various tasks. Computer Integrated Manufacturing assumes the completion of Algebra 1 and DDP or waiver. Also, concurrent enrollment in Geometry is required. There is the potential to receive college credit at a reduced rate through R.I.T. or GCC. Performance on the PLTW End of Course Assessment may result in students receiving dual credit, scholarships, or admissions preferences at various higher education institutions.

 

Digital Electronics:  This is a 1.0 credit full year course in the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) engineering program, and also in the same category as an Advanced Placement (AP) class. It is a rigorous university-level course with a final exam which allows high school students to earn college credit while still in high school. This course is patterned after the first semester course in Digital Electronics taught at two and four year colleges. Digital Electronics allows students to analyze, design, and build their own digital electronic circuits, the technology that powers phones, tablets, televisions, and video games. Digital circuits are all around us and this course provides a foundation for students who are interested in learning more about electronics and their role in today's digital world. The use of smart circuits is abundant in industry today. Its use is rapidly increasing, making Digital Electronics an important course of study for a student exploring a career in engineering/engineering technology. Students will learn how to simulate a circuit design on the computer using the latest software called Multisim. Students will get out the electronic components they need, plug them into a digital trainer (bread board), to test simple and complex real live digital circuits. Students will also learn how to solder these components to a printed circuit board and take their project home to keep. Students do not need to have any prior knowledge of electronics or PLTW courses before taking this course. Digital Electronics assumes the completion of Algebra I and Geometry with at least a C. There is the potential to receive college credit at a reduced rate through R.I.T. Performance on the PLTW End of Course Assessment may result in students receiving dual credit, scholarships, or admissions preferences at various higher education institutions.

 

Principles of Engineering (POE):  Principles of Engineering is a 1.0 credit full year course in Project Lead the Way (PLTW) engineering program, and also in the same category as an Advanced Placement (AP) class. It is a rigorous university-level course with a final exam which allows high school students to earn college credit while still in high school. In POE students apply their mathematical and scientific knowledge to solve engineering design problems. Also, POE exposes students to some of the major concepts that they will encounter in a post-secondary engineering or physics course of study. Throughout the course students will develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges. This course is an innovative, hands-on, laboratory-based set of engineering activities that convey the concepts, principles, skills, activities, and attitudes needed to be successful in the field of engineering. This course will provide direct application of math, science and technology concepts to real world design problems. Students will complete a variety of activities (both hands-on and research based) to further develop their skills in modeling, systems, optimization, technology/society interaction, design, ethics, and basic engineering activities. Engineering activities include: robotics, electricity/electronics, fluid mechanics, trajectory, simple and compound machines, and green energy. This course is a highly project-based curriculum. POE assumes the completion of Algebra I and Geometry with at least a C. There is the potential to receive college credit at a reduced rate through R.I.T. Performance on the PLTW End of Course Assessment may result in students receiving dual credit, scholarships, or admissions preferences at various higher education institutions.

 

PLTW/AP Computer Science Principles:  AP Computer Science Principles offers a multidisciplinary approach to teaching the underlying principles of computation. The course will introduce students to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, the Internet, cybersecurity concerns, and computing impacts. AP Computer Science Principles also gives students the opportunity to use current technologies to create computational artifacts for both self-expression and problem solving. Together, these aspects of the course make up a rigorous and rich curriculum that aims to broaden participation in computer science. Students will finish the course by taking the PLTW exam as well as the AP Computer Science exam. (Full year, 1.0 credit)